So what do we learn from the COVID-19 mutation? Well, firstly some things you didn’t know about the COVID-19 mutation. It is common knowledge that the DNA in every cell of our body is unique and that no two cells are ever alike. This is the first thing we learn from the mutated cells we see under a microscope.

The second thing we learn from the mutation is that the mutation changes the DNA sequence in every cell of your body. Every single cell has two sets of DNA (age band) that code for building the proteins of the cell and the specific DNA (oncoprotein) that build the muscles of the cell. In the case of the COVID-19 mutation, there is a mutation that happens when a DNA base pair is put together in a way that makes them match, or rather, make the protein of the cell look like another one.

What can we learn from this? There are many things that we can learn from the mutation because it will show us the direction that the body is going in. For example, if we know that the mutation will cause us to be less healthy than average, then we can find out ways to avoid being sick and we can build our immune systems up so that we will be able to resist diseases that are common to us. There is also a drug that has been developed by Harley medic International which can slow down the mutation. This drug is called Harmane and is in phase II clinical trials right now.

Some interesting things that you may discover when you are looking at the mutation are things like what age group you are (in the case of the COVID-19) and what sexual orientation you are (in the case of the bisexual male twins who were found to carry the COVID-19 mutation). The researchers are hoping to test people with this disease to see how their bodies work when they are exposed to different stresses in life such as pollution and other types of trauma. They are also hoping to test people who are more heavily genetically stressed such as single parents and people who are undergoing chemotherapy.

The thing that interests me about this story is that the COVID-19 mutation was first discovered thanks to a woman who was looking for answers. She was looking for information on her twins and was looking for information that would tell her if the two of them were co-twins. She wanted to know if there was a chance that one of the twins had this disorder because she didn’t want her children to have to go through the same problems. So, one day she came across a paper about this research and was impressed with it. After reading the paper, she went home and started doing some digging.

Turns out that the mutation was actually from a lab mouse. Although it’s a great finding, we’re still not sure how it happened. A certain virus could have caused it, or some environmental factors could have caused it. However, because the co-twins showed the same signs and symptoms, it appears that this disorder is genetic. Learn more about it here in this infographic designed by Harley Medic International.

 

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